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January 16, 2023

How an editor in his 20s made a hit show for Discovery (w/ Casey Faris)

Blog, Famous Editors

Sara Gerbereux

Sara Gerbereux

January 16, 2023
Casey Faris is an editor, educator, and popular YouTuber with almost 300k subscribers and over 26 million views. With a particular focus on DaVinci Resolve, Casey teaches his subscribers everything they need to know about post-production while also working as a training host at Ground Control and co-owning his own production company, Release the Hounds Studios. We discuss how Casey went from making short action films to professionally teaching editing online.
CASEY FARIS:

BECOMING AN EDITING MASTER

Although his original dream was to be a graphic designer, Casey soon got into filmmaking after watching The Matrix, in awe of the bullet time scene and other visual effects. He discovered his interest in teaching after graduating when he started making video tutorials on Adobe Director and, later, After Effects. After many months of developing his skills, Casey tells the story of his time as an executive producer and editor of Warner Bros. Discovery’s Graveyard Carz.

It was one of those things where everybody involved was so excited to make it. That, if we can pay our bills, let's just go, let's make it. A lot of it was definitely a labor of love for a long time.

Casey Faris, YouTuber and Co-owner of Release The Hounds Studios

While still working on Graveyard Carz, Casey started learning color correction and created LUT packs to post online. In light of their popularity, Casey talks about making and selling the first pack for his company, Ground Control. As he refined his career path, Casey began uploading video tutorials to his YouTube channel that also promoted his new business. With the support of his friends, Casey’s channel quickly gained views, turning what started as a fun hobby into one of the most popular channels for DaVinci Resolve tutorials on YouTube.

It was just weird because it's not like I set out to be like this amazing YouTuber or something. I just kind of kept getting these random opportunities. And then after a while, I just had to start taking things seriously.

Casey Faris, YouTuber and Co-owner of Release The Hounds Studios

Besides teaching people editing, Casey shares how he started Release the Hounds Studios, where he creates high-production-value shorts, like Tuesday On Earth. Combining his love for filmmaking and teaching, Casey develops training courses for Ground Control based on the movies he produces with RTH Studios. Casey offers his advice on what aspiring editors should focus on when they’re first learning the craft and explores how editors will need to expand their skill sets to include everything from color grading to motion graphics.

  • Don’t take yourself too seriously because you’ll end up forgetting that you’re having fun and forget that your job is fun.

  • Don’t hesitate to learn something new. Just because you’ve been using a tool that you think is the better tool doesn’t mean you shouldn’t learn other programs. In other words, don’t be close-minded to learning multiple programs.

  • Take advantage of jobs that create the perfect environments for learning. Find opportunities where it’s okay to fail and where you can learn from these mistakes.

  • If you don’t know how to do something, don’t give up. We have a variety of online resources, including Casey’s channel, where you can learn everything you need to know about post-production.

  • If you want to get serious about color grading, to the limits of the program you’re doing and when to use Premiere Pro versus DaVinci Resolve so you can more effectively and efficiently edit your film.

  • As the role of an editor evolves, you’re going to have to learn a variety of skills, from color grading to motion graphics, to keep up with the latest expectations.
EPISODE TRANSCRIPT:

OUR INTERVIEW WITH Casey

Nick Lange

Hey, guys. Welcome back to the show. Here today with Casey Faris; very popular YouTuber teaching editing, visual effects, post-production in general with a particular focus on DaVinci Resolve and Fusion. And today, we’re going to look at what has drawn him so strongly to the Blackmagic tools. And we’re going to talk about the films that he’s been producing; amazing sci-fi shorts through Release the Hounds studios. And talking about Ground Control, the platform that he and his team have been producing really in-depth post-production courses on. So, to kick it off, Casey, what was it that led you to this career? What was the moment, if you remember, when you said, oh, my gosh, I could work as a filmmaker, and that could be my job.

Casey Faris

Yeah. Yes, I was thinking about this. And really, in high school, I wanted to be a graphic designer. And I had been using some of the Adobe programs and stuff since I was like – I mean, since I could use a computer. My dad was not really a graphic designer, but he had access to the Adobe products. And so, I was using, like, Illustrator when it came out, you know, in probably not diapers, but pretty, pretty small. And I remember always just loving being able to make things digitally. And so, I was excited for that. And then in high school, me and my friends just started messing around and making movies. And what really, I think, kick that off was we saw The Matrix. And, you know, It’s kind of one of those things where I feel like sometimes, you know – it’s like this – what do you – what’s the word for it? Cliche. There we go. Sometimes, it’s kind of this cliche thing, you know. It’s like, oh, yeah, it’s The Matrix; everybody likes The Matrix. But, man, that was really just the big deal for me; is realizing what a movie could look like, and the type of effects and everything that would be available for somebody to explore.

Nick Lange

Was it the bullet time, or what – I mean, that was just a groundbreaking film. What were the scenes that stuck out to you that you still have in your mind?

Casey Faris

Yeah, I mean, all of it. Honestly, the bullet time, obviously, you know, running on walls and flying. And, I mean, just guns in general is cool. You know, it’s like a freshman in high school. You know, I think wearing sunglasses and shooting guns and stuff is the coolest.

Nick Lange

I  – for my first time seeing, I remember that just the Gatling gun in the helicopter. And I was wondering like, oh my god.

Casey Faris

Yeah. It was just – I remember, you know, that wasn’t a movie I would have been allowed to watch. But my friend snuck it over to my house and I had it on VHS. And we watched it, and it was already late at night. And I just stayed up the whole time, like watching – I was like, oh my gosh, this is the coolest thing I’ve ever seen. So, I think that’s kind of what kicked it off. And then, yeah, me and my friends wanted to make action movies, and we had, you know, fake guns. And, you know, that was right around when eBay was kind of taken off, and, you know – and so we ordered these, like, fake guns on eBay, and they just be awful. And – but we try and make movies with them and it was pretty good.

Nick Lange

Did you fake blood, or what other effects – practical effects – were you doing at that point?

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was – it was a lot of wanting to just look cool and do slow motion stuff. And so, we’d, you know, walk around the corner, and we would just slow it down in post, you know. We didn’t know anything about cameras or anything.

Nick Lange

Just doubling up the frames?

Casey Faris

Yeah, pretty much. You know, it was – it was terrible. But, I remember like, we went to Goodwill just to find stuff to break, because we wanted to break stuff in slow motion. So, we get like this big flower pot, and, you know, this guy was intimidating this other guy, and broke his flower pot on his porch and stuff. And, you know, it’s all just put to super loud Rage Against the Machine. I just thought it was cool.

Nick Lange

Of course. So, you’re making these short films. Getting better with them. Were you in Final Cut 7, or what was the software at the time? Sony Vegas?

Casey Faris

Sony Vegas. Yeah, I started in Pinnacle Studio. I think Windows Movie Maker and then – Pinnacle’s actually pretty good compared to Windows Movie Maker. And then, yeah, I found a crack for Vegas or something at some point and started working with that. And, I was like, wow, yeah, I can actually really do some cool stuff here. And it did green screen and all that stuff.

Yeah, so – it’s funny, because, yeah, a lot of people started on Final Cut; I started on Vegas. And then, once I ended up going to a – I went to a community college for multimedia production, and they all ran on Final Cut. I think it was final five at the time. And I was just like, I already know Vegas, you know, it’s fine. And so, I would just edit my stuff at home on Vegas, and quickly realized that like, I didn’t want to be that kid in school that just wouldn’t use anything that’s provided, and always thought that you, you know, you had a better tool, because that’s just like a really closed minded mindset, you know? And so, I quickly realized, I should just learn the software that is being presented to me, because it’s not going to be that hard compared to, you know. So, I ended up doing that, and that’s when I realized, like, wow, man, this is – this is really cool. And I feel like I’m pretty good at this, you know? You know, it was – it wasn’t like a big film school or anything. But, it was a bunch of people in the class that, you know, they would make a project and I go, wow, that was quite bad, you know? And then my group would make a project and it would be really cool. And so, I don’t know. It was just a time of realizing like, wow, not everyone is really pro at stuff. And not saying that I am, but I care enough to like, learn this – these things. And that’s not necessarily everybody’s priority, which I thought was a really interesting thing to kind of pick up from school, you know?

Nick Lange

Yeah. And so that was a film program that you were in?

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was multimedia production – multimedia design. So, they did all kinds of – they did like Photoshop and Illustrator; they did 3D animation and audio.

It was really great actually to have a foundation. Like, a really wide foundation on everything. And, I super appreciated it actually.

Nick Lange

So then what? What – where did you go after school?

Casey Faris

So, after school – so, at this – at this point, we learned Final Cut, Final Cut 5, Maya, and Pro Tools and Photoshop. And those were kind of the main ones that school teach – taught. 

Nick Lange

That’s a great, great combination.

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was. And, you know, it wasn’t – it was just beginner level knowledge of several things. And then, we also learned a program called Adobe director. You know what that is?

Nick Lange

Oh, I don’t remember that one.

Casey Faris

It’s kind of like a Flash sort of it was like; it was like Shockwave Flash kind of stuff.

And that – I got super into that, because it’s kind of a mixture of design as well as coding, which I was a little bit into coding and kind of excited about how that worked. And so, I ended up getting like a gig with a – with a company I was working for, making a interactive kind of training program for a – I worked for a call center, and they wanted to train people how to use the software. And so, I was like, okay, I’m gonna make a digital like version of the software that you can click on things and it pops up, and it tells you what to do and everything. And that’s all made in Shockwave basically. And that quickly – that whole app got completely nixed by Adobe, and just isn’t a thing anymore.

But I kind of went from there to realizing like, wow, there are – there are a lot of cool opportunities outside of, you know, doing wedding videos.

Nick Lange

Oh, god. Which I did for years through college, and even after for about a year. What was it working on that educational app that sort of opened your eyes to how much fun it could be teaching?

Casey Faris

What’s funny is, at that point, I started making tutorials on Adobe Director. And I don’t even know why I started, like, I just figured out how to record the screen. And I just started saying, like, okay, this is how, you know, you do this one little handler, whatever. And I was uploading them to YouTube. And I don’t know why, like, I didn’t expect anyone to watch them. I thought it was such a niche, weird program, that I’m like, nobody’s gonna care, you know, but for some reason, I like doing it. And I always thought it was interesting, because like, while I was doing it, I was just like, I don’t even know why I’m doing this. And like, my friends that were super supportive and nice, they would like watch it. And I’m like, wow, that’s really interesting. And I was like, you don’t care about this, though. But that’s cool that you watched it, you know. But I realized, like, in school, that I can learn software really quickly. I don’t know why, but it’s just not a problem for me to like, pick up a piece of software and get really good at it.

Nick Lange

I wish I had that.

Casey Faris

Man, it’s wild. And so, as I’m realizing this, I get into After Effects. And I started learning a little bit from Andrew Kramer, you know, like we all did, I’m sure. And I realize two things: one is that I really like After Effects; and two is that the way that Andrew Kramer did tutorials was really entertaining. And I was like, wait a minute, like – that’s really fun, you know.

Like, I can learn stuff and teach it. And also, you know, use software that I like. Huh, like kind of putting these little pieces together. But I ended up learning After Effects over like a couple months. And I learned it enough to get a job doing compositing for like a local TV show kind of thing. And then, that ended up being a big production company. And we kind of built a company from the ground up, which is – which is not Release the Hounds; it was a different company with a couple of people, and ended up getting a reality show on to the Discovery Networks and like, we just built it completely grassroots. But it all started with me being part of this and like, helping them kind of make this animation for this – like a short part of it.

Nick Lange

What was the concept? What was the show?

Casey Faris

The show’s called Graveyard Cars.

Nick Lange

Oh, I like that. What is it?

Casey Faris

Yeah, so, it’s basically like taking old muscle cars and bringing them back from the dead. Right?

Nick Lange

Oh, that’s awesome. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was really, really cool. So, they had this whole – they called it the cold open. It was just the first experience that you got with this show was, you know, like this old kind of Frankenstein type of old, you know, black and white film kind of style thing, where these guys go into a graveyard and they dig up this car, and they bring it home and they start working on it like in Frankenstein’s laboratory. And a lot of it was shot during the day. And they needed Day to Night conversions; they needed rotoscoping; they needed to add fog and like all that stuff out of digital moon, you know, so it looks creepy.

Nick Lange

And the car was actually buried? Like fully buried?

Casey Faris

Yeah, they did. They did. They didn’t know how bad of an idea that was, but they went ahead and did that. 

Nick Lange

That sounds hard to do.

Casey Faris

It was – it did not work well.

Nick Lange

How did they get it out? Was there like a ramp? Could they eventually just get in there and turn it on?

Casey Faris

They ended up having to dig it out with a backhoe, and like, it turned into like a whole days of work thing. And that happened actually before I was there. 

Nick Lange

That’s incredible. 

Casey Faris

But it was pretty wild.

Nick Lange

And you got to see – you were in the front row seat of watching a show get produced and picked up by a big network?

Casey Faris

Yeah, what was really cool – I’m really thankful for that experience; because one, I had – I honestly kind of had no business being part like – being hired as an After Effects person; cause like I, you know, I just didn’t have that much skill, like –

Nick Lange

Well, you’ve only been doing it for a few months.

Casey Faris

Yeah, I just only been doing it a couple of months; and so I was thankful for that. And it’s a really cool show, but really, like, the big thing was, it was me and one other guy eventually working on this show, and we had no idea what we were doing.

Nick Lange

Between the two of you? All the posts for the show?

Casey Faris

Yeah, and so this guy had gone to the local university, University of Oregon, and did the film program there. And so, he knew quite a bit; and I knew, you know, I had my knowledge. But we – neither of us had made a show; neither of us understood how to put together any kind of TV show other than just general film knowledge, you know?

Like, we didn’t know how networks work; like, we didn’t know what format they wanted; or if we were using the right cameras, or anything. This was right as DSLRs were coming out. So, we ended up shooting that show on the 5D Mark 2 and the 7D, because I sold a bunch of stuff and ended up getting a 7D. And so, we started on my personal camera and his personal camera and put together a pilot. And we’re like, in our mind, what was going to happen was we’re going to put this pilot together, and we’re going to send this off to Discovery Channel or whoever, and then we’re gonna go, this is brilliant, here’s a million dollars, please make, you know, 20 more episodes. And what actually happened was, we put the pilot together and sent it into nowhere. And for three years, we didn’t hear anything back. And we were just trying to make, you know, people like our Facebook page and make YouTube videos and stuff about it.

Nick Lange

What address did it go to? Where did you send it?

Casey Faris

Just like the offices of Discovery, I guess? Yeah, and we just – we didn’t know what even what to like – we figured we could make the show ourselves, and they could just air it, which is a thing. That’s what – that’s something that they do, but we didn’t know how to go about that at all. And so, we’re just shooting in the dark, you know. We eventually got hooked up with a distributor who knew people at Discovery, and ended up kind of working something out. And basically, Discovery bought that show from us – rented that show from us for just pennies. I mean, nothing.

Nick Lange

Wow. Interesting. And so, what was that show? This is post Graveyard Cars?

Casey Faris  

No, this is Graveyard Cars.

Nick Lange

This is Graveyard Cars? Oh, wow.

Casey Faris

Yeah, this is the first show. Yeah.

Nick Lange

Oh, my god.

Casey Faris

And so, we finally got like them to play this six episode season that we made ourselves over the course of a couple years, just being impatient; and they liked it a lot. And then, they ordered a second season. And now, it’s in its like 12th or 13th,15th seasons, something like that.

Nick Lange

It’s still going on right now? 

Casey Faris

Yeah.

Nick Lange

This is amazing. What!

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was pretty crazy.

Nick Lange

And so, are you a executive producer? Or how – what – how are you involved in it?

Casey Faris

I’m not involved anymore. I have executive producer credit for the first four seasons, I think, but ended up leaving and doing my own thing.

Nick Lange

That’s wild. So, the second season, I imagined, paid more than pennies?

Casey Faris

Slightly. Little bit. It was kind of one of those things where everybody involved was just so excited to make it that we were like, if we can pay our bills, let’s just go, you know? Like, let’s make it. So, it was a lot of – it was definitely a labor of love for a long time.

Nick Lange

That’s amazing. Okay. And so, how did the show change in that second, third season? I guess you were stepping back. Was there – was that by choice? Did you – did you want to work on other things?

Casey Faris

Yeah, I mean, over the course, like – I like – what I – what I was – what I was getting to, was that this show was like the perfect environment for learning. Because the way that our – the guy who was running it – our boss – the way that he approached things was so – was just so much like – we’re just going to go for it and learn as we go. That it created this environment where it was okay to fail, and it was okay to try and just do your best; and if it doesn’t work, then try something else. And that’s really what we did for a few years. And I learned so much during that time, and the guys that I worked with learn so much. And so, one of the things that I learned was all about color grading and color correction. And we started, I mean, we made the pilot for the show, and it’s shot on a mix of different cameras. And then I’m like, well, none of these cameras match. How do we deal with that? And that was back in the Apple Color days; Apple Color had just come out. And so, I’m like, alright, and so it picked up Apple Color and kind of worked with that and ended up doing color correction. It took like, three weeks because I had no idea what I was doing.

Nick Lange

Yep. Special monitor or just right there on your computer?

Casey Faris

Nope, just on a iMac; I think Mac Pro, maybe. And, you know, it wasn’t good. It didn’t look good, but it was better than anybody else was doing around here. I was – I was as qualified as anybody else working on the show.

So, that’s when I realized, man, I really like color, and this is really interesting to me. And so, I ended up just diving into that. And so, I – so your question was like, how did it change? Like, I kind of stepped back into more of a, I’m doing less of a – I’m doing everything role, and more of a, I’m just gonna focus on like, some of the editing and color.

And we’re gonna let other people do other things, which was my first lesson and delegating stuff.

Nick Lange

Yeah. And so what – during that first season – were you staffing up as quickly as possible? Finding – were there directors you were bringing on post? Post, guys? How did that work?

Casey Faris

I laugh because you would think, and it – that sounds like a really professional good idea.

Nick Lange

It was all you, wasn’t it? 

Casey Faris

But it was more like, yeah, I was working on this, and a couple other people would come in on the weekends. So, that guy was like collecting unemployment, and kind of like coming in and just volunteering. And we did that for a long time.

Nick Lange

A nationally televised show. Just creating it. That’s incredible. Okay. So, you discover this love of color. And so, what happened in those following years?

Casey Faris

Yeah, so, a couple things happen is one, we’re shooting Cinestyle on our cannons, which people –

Nick Lange

Which is their – like their log format?

Casey Faris

Yeah, people don’t know. It’s like a log format – sort of – for the Canon DSLRs. And so, we’re shooting that, and we had to color correct all of that. And I realized a couple of things, like, one is, people don’t really understand color at all.

And some people understand it enough to know that you should shoot log, and then they don’t have any idea what to do with it. And so, I ended up making some presets; making some LUTs actually for the different cameras that we use on the show. And so, we ended up like, I can throw this LUT on this camera, and it looks pretty good, and was speeding up our workflow and stuff. And so, I ended up putting some of those LUTs up on our website, and was like, hey, if anybody needs like these LUTs that kind of help with – we develop these, if you want to download them, go for it. And that was about the same time that I was getting into DaVinci Resolve and started – and starting to work on that. And that was back in Resolve 9? Resolve 8. When it just did color, and that’s all.

Nick Lange

I remember that. Yeah.

Casey Faris

It was quite – it was quite a feat to get your project into Resolve so that you can do color; and then you’d have to export back out to whatever you were using. But even though that was awkward, the tools in Resolve were so good that I was just like, well, we have to use this. I’m dropping Apple Color, because Apple Color – I never experienced Apple Color and had it work consistently.

Nick Lange

Perfect. That’s what you want, right?

Casey Faris

Yeah, but that was such a big deal. So, I ended up learning Resolve and posting these LUTs at the same time, and just getting super into color stuff. And then, I noticed one day that our LUTs were getting a ton of downloads. And like, we didn’t have a big popular website; we weren’t that great at social media. Like, it was just organic; like, people finding LUTs and downloading them.

Nick Lange

Through search or how would they find it?

Casey Faris

Yeah, through search, like it just came out. I think I made, like a blog about like, how we color correct our cameras and link to the – link to the LUTs.

And they found it. And I mean, it was like – it was like, I think a few 100 like – when I checked it, it was like a couple of weeks later, and it was a few 100 downloads which was, you know – with no, you know – from scratch is like pretty good.

And so I was like, is this a thing? Like, that’s really weird. And so, I ended up making our first pack for Ground Control, just kind of on a whim. Like, one day, I was like, I don’t know, let’s go – let’s go shoot some samples, and I’ll make some color grades and put it up in a pack and sell it for 20 bucks or something.

Nick Lange

And that wasn’t – wasn’t really happening yet? You weren’t following someone else’s lead? You just – oh, that’s amazing. You’re up against a huge industry.

Casey Faris

There were – so, there was like – what was it? Vision color. Vision Color had LUTs. And that’s pretty much it, from what I could tell. But the – you know, their LUTs were general.

Nick Lange

Yup. So you were doing more specialized, cool LUTs?

Casey Faris

Yeah. So, this was the first LUTs that were designed for specific cameras, right. And so, this was also – this was a little bit before the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera came out; the first one. Which was like, the first camera that anyone like me could afford that shot really high-quality stuff, you know? That was less than $3,000 or something.

Nick Lange

Yeah, that was a game changer. We shot something on that and we’re just amazed.

Casey Faris

Yeah. And like, from there, I realized, like, wow, really, like a lot of people bought this camera and nobody knows how to use it. They know it’s awesome, and they have no idea what to do after that. And so, I ended up making a digital book, like an ebook on how to use this camera, and that’s kind of where that came in. And then, the LUTs thing came in, and realize like, yeah, people need help figuring this stuff out that I already know, because I’ve been learning like tour de force for the last five years of how to deal with this stuff.

Nick Lange

And how did you get that book out there? Was this one your – you started posting on YouTube?

Casey Faris

Yeah, this was about the same time. Yeah, I put the – I think the ebook was just on Amazon. Like, make it in Word and then upload it to Amazon or whatever.

Nick Lange

Okay. So, a digital PDF, essentially?

Casey Faris

It was – it was a Kindle. It was like a Kindle version. Yeah. They’re like a converter thing.

Nick Lange

How popular was that?

Casey Faris

It wasn’t, like, insane, but it was more than I thought it would be, because it quickly got quite a bit of attention on like, No Film School, and like, some blogs and stuff; and I think there’s a few other blogs that were into it. And so like, you know, I get comments and reviews and emails and stuff about it. And I was like, people are actually reading this. You know, I’m like, I probably should have tried a little harder to make this good, because I kind of threw it together, you know?

Nick Lange

That’s even better. Low effort. High yield. And so then what? So, you’re posting your videos, you’re starting – were you getting views right away? Were you getting subscribers right away?

Casey Faris

Yeah. I – it was one of those things where, you know, my friends subscribed and everything, and I’d like 200 subscribers or whatever. And I would post, like, videos of me doing camera tests and stuff. And I ended up doing, like, a quick tutorial on how to color grade the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, because again – because nobody knew how to do it. And I was like, this is what I do; I don’t even know if it’s right. I literally learned by, like, trying really hard for the last few years. But this is how I do it. And then, that got on, like – that got a huge share on No Film School.

And it like, within a couple of months, I had like 4000 subscribers. And I was like, is this a thing? Like, that was kind of a lot of it; is just falling into, like – I make something, and I’m not even sure why. I think because I just like to make things, and then people like it. And I was like, oh, this is a real thing.

Nick Lange

That’s great. You fall into opportunity.

Casey Faris

Yeah, it’s kind of been a lot of that. Yeah. So, after that came out, I was kind of in – I don’t know – friendly competition with a guy I was working with, who was also a nerd and liked making things and, you know, like, color grading and stuff, and he would make tutorials; and we would kind of both make tutorials; and like, sort of, you know, low-key compete with each other. And that went on for a few months and stuff. And then, I got like, a couple more shares on No Film School, and it was a – it was crazy, because like, my account started blowing up. And I felt bad, because I’m like – I’m not trying to like, you know – like, it kind of went from like, oh, this is fun, we’re competing to like, you know – I feel like he kind of felt bad, and it was kind of this awkward thing.

Nick Lange

Did he keep going, or is he still doing it now?

Casey Faris

Yeah, he kept doing some other stuff. I think he kind of got out of the tutorial game and kind of did his own thing, which was cool. Like, he’s brilliant; great guy. But, like, it was – it was just weird, because it’s not like I set out to be like this amazing YouTuber or something. I just kind of kept getting these random opportunities. And then after a while, I just had to start taking things seriously, because once I had, you know, a few 1000 subs, I was like, well, I guess I should probably make videos on a regular basis instead of whenever I want. And so, I tried to make the video like every two weeks for a while, and then it ended up being every week. And I stayed with that for probably – probably a couple years, just making a video every week.

Nick Lange

Wow. That’s great. Hard not to do. When you wanted to travel or take a vacation, would you double up? Do two or even three?

Casey Faris

No. I – honestly, and I’m still kind of not this, like – I’m still not that worried about it. Like, because, if I don’t post for a week, it’s not a big deal; it’s fine. As long as I’m generally aiming for like – for, you know, a few a month.

Nick Lange

The algorithm will continue loving you.

Casey Faris

Yeah, yeah. It’s – that’s the thing I’ve learned about being a creative person; is that you – if you take yourself too seriously, you forget that you’re having fun. Like, you forget that this is fun.

It’s such a cool job, you know? And I – like, I tell people I work with now – it’s like, oh, when we get all stressed out about a project and like to – we, like the other day – we were like – we were all worried about this thing. We were all just like sitting on the couch just like ugh; and I was like, hold on, we’re stressed out about figuring out where a pretend spaceship flies. That’s what we’re stressed about. 

How awesome is our life? And we all started laughing, you know?

Nick Lange

I worked with a girl who would remind me sometimes we’re not saving lives.

Casey Faris

Exactly. Yes. Yeah, it’s not heart surgery. It’s just – it’s just movies. It’s okay, you know.

Nick Lange

Yup. Yup. Yeah. So, on that thought, I think that’s a perfect transition to Tuesday on Earth. You have that amazing rocket opening that scene. Really cool visual effects – visual effects throughout that piece.

And then Time is Money. Great – great sci-fi short film. What – what has – tell me about Release the Hounds? Tell me about your experience producing really high production value sci-fi shorts, and where you want to go from here with those?

Casey Faris

Yeah. It’s funny that you say sci-fi shorts, because, like, we never really necessarily planned on just being doing short sci-fi shorts; but that is generally what we do. Like, we have – we have a couple other in the works that they’re both sci fi shorts, so whatever.

Nick Lange

You have a knack for it.

Casey Faris

I – Dude, I love sci fi.

Nick Lange

I do too. 

Casey Faris

Honestly, like, that’s my favorite genre of anything.

Nick Lange

Same. They’re the best. Yes. 

Casey Faris

Yeah. Like, my favorite movie for a long time – I mean, obviously I like The Matrix; I loved Independence Day. 

Nick Lange

Oh, yeah, that was a classic. 

Casey Faris

Dude, like, so good, you know. I love aliens and monsters, and all that stuff.

Nick Lange

The first Stargate was the one that as a kid blew my mind. I saw it in the theater, and my head exploded. I said, oh my god.

Casey Faris

Oh, man. I have not gotten into Stargate actually. 

Nick Lange

Ah, okay, okay. I only ever saw that first one, but it was like, I could not have imagined a better movie when I watched that. 

Casey Faris

Wow. Yeah, I gotta check it out. You’re like the second person I’ve heard mentioned that very recently. So, that’s interesting. Huh.

Nick Lange

And then I dropped my wallet. I was like – I don’t know – maybe eight or something. I dropped my wallet in the theater. I was there with my grandparents, and we left; and we get in the car; and because I was in such a – such a daze, leaving, like – like I was still in the movie as we’re walking.

I was like, what did I just see? We get in the car and I was like, oh no, my wallet, with my life savings in it. So, we go back to, you know, find the aisle we’d been sitting in, and can sort of remember what seats they were. So, I’m looking under all the seats in the dark, and I find this – my wallet, except it wasn’t my wallet; it was the exact same, like, red cloth, and a little gray lining, but it wasn’t mine because someone had scribbled all over it with pen and like graffitied the hell out of it and it was empty. I was like, what are the chances that someone knows the exact same?

Casey Faris

Dude, that’s wild.

Nick Lange

I was too young to accept the fact that someone had just destroyed my wallet after taking the cash. So, I thought it was just a coincidence that there happened to be this other one laying there. 

I’m happy that I didn’t understand what happened. 

Casey Faris

How long – wait – how much time went in between those?

Nick Lange

Like, 20 minutes.

Casey Faris

Somebody found a wallet, took all the stuff out, and wrote on it?

Nick Lange

And drew, like, elaborate graffiti all over it; and, like, dicks.

Casey Faris

Why? 

Nick Lange

I don’t know. 

Casey Faris

Like, that almost takes some planning. It’s like I’mma look for wallets today.

Nick Lange

It was – they executed perfectly. 

Casey Faris

Wow. What a world. 

Nick Lange

That always goes hand in hand with my first amazing sci-fi experience. So, you have a couple in the works. Can you give me any hints or just a general direction that you’re going with Release the Hounds?

Casey Faris 

Yeah. So, one of the things we’re focusing on these days is training. So, it was pretty – pretty obvious to us pretty quick. I mean, as soon as I started doing tutorials, I’m like, wow, having material to teach on is pretty rough; because you can use like – a lot of the time, I use stock footage for just one off tutorials. But if you want people to download stuff and follow along with it, a lot of sites don’t – don’t have that, like, in their rights, you know? You’d have to pay a lot of money to do that. And so, I’m like, why don’t we just make movies that we want to make? And then do training on them? 

You know? Like, this is, like – we kind of realized this after, you know, because we sold LUTs for a really long time; we still do, but we’re not really making any more LUTs. But we ended up releasing a training a couple years ago that did really well, and it was really fun and pretty easy to make, and people really liked it. And I was like, man, if we could just have material, we could just make training. Like, that’s just the problem. And we ended up hiring our friend that we worked with at graveyard cars, actually. And we’re like, hey, man, will you help us edit? And will you help us? Like, what if we just started making our own movies? Because this is a way for us to pay for ourselves making our movies. 

Nick Lange

That’s such a fun reason to make movies. Yeah, that’s great. 

Casey Faris

Nobody gets to do that. Like, nobody gets to make whatever they want and get paid for it. And I was like, did we just hack the Gibson? Like, is this – is this real life? And we all looked at each other. We’re like, okay, and so we tried it. And like, yeah, man, it’s working pretty well. So.

Nick Lange

And so, every short that you’re shooting, have they all been – become part of trainings?

That’s cool. I didn’t realize that. Okay.

Casey Faris

Yeah. So, the first one – the first one we really did this with is Time is Money. And so, we have a training – that end-to-end training – and that takes you through the entire post-production process of that film. Every shot – every minute of every shot. 

Nick Lange

That’s awesome. 

Casey Faris

Yeah. And so, I had never seen a training that does that – of course, that does that. And so, I was really excited about that; and people really liked it, you know? And then, after that – 

Nick Lange

Are you seeing their cuts? How often will you see the creative different interpretations of that footage?

Casey Faris

You know, nobody’s really showed us one of their cuts. And I almost wonder if people don’t necessarily go through it all themselves, you know. We’ve done a lot of like, case studies, and trying to figure out how people learn, and how people like, enjoy the training the most. And I don’t think anybody really cuts their whole film together. I could be wrong.

Nick Lange

Okay. Maybe they’re focus on a certain area that they really want to learn.

Casey Faris

I think that’s a lot of it, is that they want to see it from beginning to end, but they don’t actually need to do the whole thing themselves. But the opportunity is there. They could just completely edit the film if they want to, you know. So – but yeah, we did that for the end to end training. And then, are – we did an intro to resolve training and a color training, and each of those has a film or a project that’s related to it. And so, Tuesday on Earth was designed for the intro, just so that there’s a little bit of everything; there’s a little bit of visual effects; there’s color; there’s audio; there’s everything. And if they download that training, they have a select number of assets from that film that they can kind of practice these things on. 

Nick Lange

That’s great. 

Casey Faris

And then, same for color; they can color grade the entire ungraded movie. And there’s also another project which is just a sketch that we did. But we have another training coming out very soon, which is on the editing workflow. So, it’s all about how you actually create a project and some of the stuff that we’ve learned over the years: how to edit faster; how to tell better stories with a little bit of the extra stuff, like color grading and everything. But that is – that’s on a new film that we’re gonna release at the same time. 

Nick Lange

I love asking people – so, making these short films, what production chaos have you experienced? What’s been the biggest onset nightmare you’ve dealt with?

Casey Faris

Yeah. Well, the other day, shooting this film, that part of it is set in an old warehouse, like, you know – you think about, like – okay, think about the warehouse that the bad guys that steal the dog in the dog movie, and keep the dog there? That’s the warehouse that they’re in, okay?

Nick Lange

You found the warehouse.

Casey Faris

Yeah, it’s the warehouse where they keep the dog, right? 

Nick Lange

Are the dogs still there?

Casey Faris

All of them. Yes. Yeah. 

Nick Lange

I’m going.

Casey Faris

Every bad guy from every Air Bud movie, holds up here. And we ended up shooting at this junkyard, which sort of look – parts of it sort of look like a warehouse. And we did – we got permission to do this, and planned it all out and everything, and scheduled everything months in advance. And then, the day comes and it’s just pouring rain. It’s just the most rain we’ve ever had on a day here in Oregon, which is – we’re used to rain, but it was a lot of rain. And so, this whole place is just a mud hole. And we’re trying to get things done, and the guy – and so, we can’t bring any of our lights out because we don’t have any waterproof lights or anything. And the sun’s going down, and the whole thing has to be day for night, or at night with a lot of light. And so we’re like, what do we do? And the old guy, that’s like in charge of the junkyard, he’s like, well, I don’t know if this would help at all, but I do have this giant waterproof light, you know? Like, this industrial light. And I was like, no, I don’t think that would help at all. Get the light out so we can shoot. 

Nick Lange

Why would we want that?

Casey Faris

And so, he ended up – he ended up taking this light out, and just like dragging it through the mud. And like, you know, he had to jumpstart it and all that stuff. 

Nick Lange

Wow. It was powerful. It gave you what you needed?

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was – it was perfect. And so, we lit up, like, this entire, like, probably acre of junk with this one light. And now, it’s our moonlight basically. 

Nick Lange

Ah, perfect. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, and it was great. But, it was just like – it went from, I don’t know what we’re going to do to like, this is amazing. And we also have, like, real rain and all this stuff. It was so cool. 

Nick Lange

Oh, that sounds awesome. Wow. That’s not usually what happens in that situation. How great. So, I would love to dig into what it was that drew you to DaVinci Resolve, and just the suite of tools that when you were – I feel like you are an early pioneer; early adopter, who’s been a huge fan for years now at a very interesting – now, of course, everyone’s realizing, oh, my God, this is amazing software, and it’s quickly stealing market share from Premiere. What was it that drew you initially? And how do you feel the software – I watched the great video, where you’re just watching – I think it was Resolve 17, where you’re talking about – as they’re doing a product release, you’re like, oh my god, this is a feature – I’ve been wanting this. And it felt like over and over again in that product announcement, they’re like, identifying things that you’ve really wanted. Like, it seems like a small thing, but these are the things that save you time, you know, day-to-day.

So, how are they – how do they – tell me about software – how are they keeping it? How do they keep hitting such a sweet spot with these updates?

Casey Faris

Yeah. Feel like there’s a lot – a lot there. Well, okay, so some background, I was super into Final Cut for a long time, and through Final Cut 7 to where they kind of discontinued that, and then jumped over about CS 5.5 to Adobe. And loved Adobe. Like I said, I’ve been using Adobe since I was like five years old or whatever. And it’s funny how the culture has changed from, you know – before me, from what I can tell, it’s like if you don’t use Avid, then why are you even editing? To then, if you don’t use Final Cut 7, why are you even editing? And then, if – and then, it’s like, oh, I edit on Premiere, and it’s like, okay. 

Nick Lange

I remember that. 

Casey Faris

Sure you do. You know? It’s like, no you don’t. You just can’t afford Final Cut, so. And then, that quickly became like, yeah, if you’re serious, you edit on Premiere. Like, what are you talking about? You know?

Nick Lange

Then it was like, are you kidding? You’re still on Final Cut?

Casey Faris

Yeah, exactly. And then, it’s like, oh, Final Cut 10 came out; and they’re like, yeah, but, come on. Although, there’s a lot of – a lot of really good stuff about Final Cut 10. I wouldn’t throw them under the bus.

Nick Lange

Yeah, I’m meeting more and more people who love it. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, yeah. And so, I was super into Premiere, and loved After Effects. Like I said, I mean, that was my main, main job for quite a while. But yeah, what really got me over into Resolve was the color correction. I mean, it’s just phenomenal Color Corrector. And the thing is, like, anymore – like, I was just looking at this the other day: if you want to color grade your film, you can do it in Lumetri. And it works great. It looks good. It’s very powerful. I’m not going to complain about Lumetri at all. But, if you want to go one level deeper than just doing a look, and doing basic corrections on all of your shots, that’s where Lumetri gets awkward real quick. Like, it just – you just don’t go that deep because it’s hard, right?

Nick Lange

Awkward how?

Casey Faris

So, for instance, if I wanted to select somebody’s face and brighten it, right? You can put another Lumetri effect on it, and you can select their face; you can even track their face. I don’t know about you. Every time I’ve tried to do that, Premiere crashes or at least has trouble, or goes slowly, and it’s kind of just a thrown together feeling thing. And that’s for one shot, you know? And then, you want to go to a different shot. And if you want to do that level of color grading to your entire project, it’s just – there’s so much; so many hoops you need to jump through, that you just tend to be like, a basic color grade is fine. You know? And so, that’s cool. But with resolve in the same amount of time; the same amount of energy, I mean, you can make it look just awesome. You can adjust five different parts of your shot; and you can track it; and you can do all this stuff, like, in the same amount of time. And so, it’s just when you compare those things, the amount of control that Resolve gives you is just – it’s a no-brainer to me.

So, that’s how I got into Resolve, is, you know – especially coming from Apple Color, and being like, wow, this is –  this is a much better – much better program, and it’s free. So, I’ll try it out; and I can use it and it’s great. And so, we color graded, you know, our whole TV show on free version of Resolve, you know. But once it started – once they – once they brought editing into it, the first – the first time they kind of brought the timeline in, they’re like, yeah, you can edit in Premiere, or in Resolve.

You know, and so, like, yeah, you could kind of do stuff, but it was really jank. Like, it was messed up. And so, everybody’s like, yeah, that’s cute, you know. But then the next year it came out, and it was like, all the problems were fixed. Like, 90% of them were fixed. And to the point where like, wow, this is quite good, actually. 

Nick Lange

Oh, they got serious. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, it got serious. And then, you’re like, okay, I could see if you wanted to do a small project; you could edit it in Resolve, and it would be cool. And then, that’s nice, because you can jump into the color page in it; you don’t have to like, throw XMLs back and forth. That’s great.

Nick Lange

So that was Resolve too? That was like a significant improvement?

Casey Faris

That was – that was a significant improvement. I think that was like 12ish. Somewhere in there. 

Nick Lange

Okay, okay. Okay, cause they already been iterating on the color. Sweet. The color tool fo awhile. 

Casey Faris

Oh, yeah. The color has been amazing forever; the color was amazing back in eight when I started. But then – so – that it’s kind of like yeah, okay, that’s cool, you know. But then, the next year, it was like that much better again. 

And I remember there being – okay, because there was a time when we were editing on Final Cut; and we went to NAB; and Adobe had their booth there; and they’re like, this is what you can do in Adobe. And we’re just like, why haven’t we switched yet? Like, this is amazing. Like, we’re going to use this tool. And we went home, and we like switched all of our computers from Final Cut to Adobe, right? 

That moment happened with, I think, Resolve 14, when it came out.

Nick Lange

Same watershed moment where it’s like oh my god, it leapfrogged. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, it was just like, this is amazing. Like, why – this does everything that Premiere does, for the most part; like for 90% of what you want to do, but you can easily go into color. And so, at that point, that was after we had started our production company. And we were still like – I was doing Resolve tutorials and editing them on Premiere. And then, putting them out and everything. But, I started editing on Resolve, and I was like, this is actually really good. And I showed my friend – my coworker – and he’s like, yeah, this is really good. And why are we – why are we paying for Adobe? This is really weird. And so – but, we’re like, well, After Effects, Photoshop. Okay. You know?

And then they basically did that thing every time they updated Resolve. 

Nick Lange

Every update was a massive improvement.

Casey Faris

It was just a massive improvement, and/or they added a whole new thing. Like, they added the Fairlight page, which is all about audio, you know; it’s basically Adobe Audition, but built into the – into the software. And then, they added Fusion, and that’s, you know, competes with After Effects. And so, it was just like, well, this is actually amazing. And so, it was – it was at a point where we’re like, I opened up our Adobe account to, like, load an old project that we had; and it was like, last opened 400 days ago. Like, Premiere had been last open 400 days ago. And I was like, why are we paying for this? So, I mean, we canceled our Adobe subscription, and we’re like, just on full Resolve. And that’s been, yeah, couple years – couple years at least; three or four years.

Nick Lange

So, now a lot of people are doing that. What do you think is for the editor, who’s earlier in their career, or just ready to double down on a tool? Do you think it’s wise to be focusing on Resolve? And how do you think the software landscape is going to evolve in the coming years?

Casey Faris

Yes, I think it’s wise to do Resolve; one big thing is it’s free. I mean, you download it and try it out. You don’t have anything to lose. I have yet to find a major thing. I mean, other than gimmicky things, like a certain plugin, or certain random feature, I have yet to find some huge reason to use any Adobe thing over Resolve. There just doesn’t seem to be a killer feature there that really – yeah, it just doesn’t exist for me anyway, for the stuff that I’m making. 

But the great thing is, like, if you learn the edit page of Resolve, you basically know Premiere. It’s the same thing. Like, you can – if you get good at editing in the edit page for free, and then you get a job on Premiere, it’s going to take you a solid weekend to like, figure out how to use Premiere. So, it’s like, you have nothing to lose.

Nick Lange

In one of your videos, you said a lot of people don’t understand the edit page, but you think it’s brilliant? What did you mean by that? 

Casey Faris

Yeah. So, the cut page is something that they released a couple versions ago; and it’s based on the thought of saving you time and letting you edit faster, right? So, it’s all about like – okay, you spend a lot of time zooming into your timeline and scrolling around to find your clips, you know. You spend a lot of time double clicking on something and dragging it over, and those kinds of things. And so, it’s a different interface that takes that stuff out to where you can really quickly put together, you know, a simple edit. Like, you probably wouldn’t do a feature film with a ton of like audio work or something all in the cut page. But, you could lay out a rough cut of it in the cut page. And it’s really kind of designed for news shooters, you know; people that just going to put together a news story for vlogs; anything that’s like one line of, you know, clips with attached audio, you know? Like, on camera audio. You can put stuff like that together super quick. And it also – it uses this thing: the speed editor, and it’s like designed to give you tactile control; and you don’t have to use the mouse; and it’s just like, you can really put something together fast with a little bit of – with a little bit of practice. And I mean, it is – it’s brilliant. It’s really cool. But only for some things, right? So, like, I mean, if you’ve logged every day, no question. Like, that would be an amazing thing to learn, you know. If you’re putting together a 17 camera music video – I mean, honestly, actually, the cut page is really good for multicam, too. So.  

Nick Lange

I’m curious. I have to look at it. Where do you think the – what’s going to happen to the editor? The role of the editor and the couple in the coming years? And what about the role of the visual effects artists, especially as we enter – you know, as we approach the metaverse, and a time when there’s going to be a need for a lot of builders who can model assets and create environments that we’re all going to be spending a lot of time in.

Casey Faris

Yeah. I think what’s going to continue to happen is just what’s already happening with editors, is an editor is no longer somebody who just edits, you know; it’s somebody who maybe primarily puts things together in the timeline, but also knows how to color grade, and knows how to do some effects and graphics, and stuff like that, just because the tools are so easy to get a hold up now. And I mean, especially in Resolve, it’s all one tool, basically. 

And I mean – and not a slouch either. I mean, really, really professional level tools. And so – like we did a survey a while ago, and we asked what’s your – what’s your biggest challenge – editing, like when it comes to editing? And the main response – and we got a lot of responses that were color grading is hard. Or Fusion is hard, you know; compositing and graphics is hard, which isn’t editing. That’s different.

Nick Lange

Right, but they’re all thinking about it, and they consider that part of their role. 

Casey Faris

They consider that part of editing. And so, I’m like, wow. So, that was a big thing for us, because we were gonna put together this like editing training. And we realized, like, man, if we put this together, I don’t know if anybody’s gonna buy it; because, first of all, they don’t even know if they want editing. Like, people generally don’t feel like – I don’t feel like they need a lot of help with the editing part of editing; because they figure it’s just part of the big thing, you know. What they really need help with is color grading and stuff. And if we make an editing class, and they buy it; and it doesn’t include color grading, they’re gonna say, I thought you were teaching me editing.

Nick Lange

Oh, that’s wild. I love that. So, what – and this is something I’ve talked about with a few people on the show recently, is what used to be such siloed roles in recent years are very much becoming, you know – the expectation is changing to you; you need to know how to do all of these things. 

We did a – we filmed a course, and our posts on it right now about –  it’s called The Art of the Trailer, and it’s taught by a guy who runs one of the big Hollywood movie trailer studios. And something he said, which has really stuck with me, is that the editor of, you know – the star editor that they’re looking to hire is not just an editor; it is that predator or that, you know, the one – the one man band, or the one woman band who has the creative mind; they can think about the concept; they can write it; they can pitch it to the to the team or to the client; then they can go – they have a great sense of music and pacing; and they can create an amazing music edit; they do a wonderful edit; they can copyright you know, as necessary. Sometimes, they’ll be writing pieces of creative content that – then that agency will have access to the actors from the movie to go out and shoot additional content that wasn’t even in the film, or record voiceover that this editor has written for that trailer. And then, of course, you know, they’re fluent in motion design that can help design the look for those titles and be involved with the color. And I think for them, it’s still going to have colors, but I think it’s so interesting to see this transition as people are empowered by all these now increasingly free tools. Like you mentioned before we started recording, a blender is another free, amazing piece of 3D software. How versatile artists are becoming.

Casey Faris

Yeah. I think that’s – we’re just going to see more and more of that, you know. I mean, even – and that’s the thing, is like, now we live in this environment where, you know, a 12-year-old kid can get on YouTube and learn how to use the most professional tools available. You know? It’s like, dude, if you have a gaming PC, you can do anything for free. 

Nick Lange

Yeah. Oh, it’s wild. So, now, looking at that 12-year-old kid, let’s say they’re in Blender; they’re creating, like, amazing 3D assets that they’re modeling. What do you think that kid’s future could look like, building – being involved in building the metaverse?

Casey Faris

Yeah, I’ll tell you what – I mean, if there’s going to be this huge VR World, you know – this digital world – going to need stuff, you know. And I mean, even just basic modeling. I mean, you could probably get a job. I’m pretty confident, like, there’s enough stuff going on these days, and enough websites to advertise things on. Like, you could probably get a side hustle going, if you had some pretty good creative skill in some way. Like, pretty easily. Like, if you – if you are professional, and you have a body of even a few pieces, like literally, I’m – I don’t think it’s overstating it that like, if you know how to use Blender, and you took a solid weekend to make like five or six objects. Like,  literally model the objects and be like – and then post it on Upwork or whatever you want. Like, you could probably get a job doing something.

Nick Lange

It’s a lot of work. Yes. Yeah, I believe it. What is one thing that your hundreds of 1000s of subscribers don’t know about you? 

Casey Faris

Ah, let’s see. One thing that they don’t know about me. Feel like I’m a pretty open book for the most part. Okay, so, my music tastes. Alright. I am a huge fan of super heavy screaming music. 

Nick Lange

Screamo.

Casey Faris

I’ve actually done a little bit of that myself. Yup. I’m a super emo kid; love Warped Tour, that kind of stuff.

Nick Lange

Awesome. One of my good friends is the biggest screamo fan I’ve ever met, and you would never know it from meeting him.

Casey Faris

Yeah, it’s funny, huh? So, love that stuff. My second favorite genre, or maybe even more than that, is coffee shop music, like, you know, girl and a guitar. You know, just super chill, like lullaby kind of music. Love that. 

Nick Lange

Who’s an artist that you like in that genre? 

Casey Faris

Do you know JJ Heller?

Nick Lange

Not yet. I’ll look her up. 

Casey Faris

Or, like – trying to think who else it would be. I forget – I forget their names. I’m terrible with names sometimes. But yeah, man. The total gamut, you know. 

Nick Lange

Different ends of the spectrum. Cool. And how will that inspire your – will it ever inspire your music choices, and your videos or films? Or is it – Have you gotten to use some screaming?

Casey Faris

Honestly, like, the thing that has inspired my music choices on films and stuff has been, like, Dubstep. Like, a lot of the ground control trailers are like, super hardcore on Dubstep and everything. It’s like – but I know, like – Dubstep is kind of cool, because it’s sort of self aware. It just, like, it knows it’s kind of cheesy, but it’s fine. You know, like, everybody’s okay with it. 

So, I don’t know. So, it’s a little bit of that, but we’re actually doing a lot of music in-house now. One of our editors, who is a genius, just was like – one day was like, hey, can I – can we get Ableton, because I want to make music. And I’m like, yeah, man, sure, get Ableton. And now, he like scores our films? And they’re amazing.

Nick Lange

That’s – you’re so lucky. That is awesome.

Casey Faris

Yeah, it’s just like, dude, how have you been holding out on us for years, like, and you’re just this amazing composer, randomly.

Nick Lange

Good composers are so hard to find, and so expensive when you do find them. 

Casey Faris

Well, it’s like everything that we make, we want to be able to let somebody download and use for their own stuff, you know. 

Nick Lange

Right. So, you all have full rights to that music. 

Casey Faris

Yeah, we can’t use a stock music site; we have to have it made. 

Nick Lange

Well, I – Casey, this was great. Thank you for a really interesting interview. A lot – a lot to think about here. And so, you mentioned a little bit about what you’re working on. But in a couple words, what can we look forward to?

Casey Faris

Ah, we’re basically – we’re trying to make it so people don’t have anything in the way of them being able to be creative, right? So, like our five year plan or whatever, is that we want to be able to teach the most accessible and high quality software, so that people can make whatever they want. That’s the deal. I love it when people are free to be creative. So, I mean, more tutorials on Resolve for free; more in-depth training for free in Resolve; we’re going to be getting into Blender; we’re going to be getting into Unreal Engine. 

Which are all free, amazing pieces of software, you know. And if there’s another piece of software that comes out that’s amazing, when it comes to post-production and stuff, we’re probably going to be into it in some way. 

Nick Lange

Well, it shows that energy comes through in your videos. So, looking forward to those. Thank you, and we’ll talk more soon.

Sara Gerbereux

Sara Gerbereux

January 16, 2023

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