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November 2, 2022

5 Ways Editors Get Clients

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Sara Gerbereux

Sara Gerbereux

November 2, 2022
When someone talks about being a trailer editor, do you picture them working in a dark room in front of their computer? Well, you wouldn’t be alone. Many people don't realize that the trailer industry is very customer-focused and that editors need to develop strong, trusting relationships with the marketing teams they work with. So, how does a trailer editor build a positive relationship with their clients? With the help of Brett Winn, creative director and founding partner of The Refinery, let’s examine the essential qualities that are required for an editor to do just that.
CLIENT INVOLVEMENT

ADAPTABILITY

A project’s success depends on how well an editor can work with the information and feedback given by their clients. This means being able to adapt to a client who wants to be fully involved in the process and a client who wants to offer very little input.

Establish open communication with your client that enables them to involve themselves in different aspects of the project at any moment during the process. Make sure that you have a clear understanding of the client’s expectations for their role in the project, and don’t pressure them to be more or less involved.

If you have a great relationship with a client, you can ask questions and say, 'Hey, I don’t know if this is going to work…Can I suggest something else?'

Brett Winn, Creative Director at The Refinery.

OPEN COMMUNICATION

BE PERSONABLE AND ARTICULATE

As previously mentioned, it’s important to communicate with your clients effectively. This means being personable in a way that builds trust between you and your client and being able to articulate your thoughts in a clear and concise manner. Creating this open line of communication makes it easier for you, as the editor, to ask questions and share your own feedback on what a client wants for the project.

attentive and observant

mastering body language

When it comes to building a positive relationship with your client, it’s essential to learn their body language and intonations. In most situations, body language frequently conveys much more information than what is actually said out loud. Being able to understand that a client is defensive because they are crossing their arms or displeased based on their furrowed eyebrows and harsh tone can help you better understand their needs and expectations.

This, in turn, also means that you should also be able to exert strong control over your own body language and intonation. Notice when your body language or tone becomes judgmental or aggressive, and work to correct it immediately.

When we cut a version one of a trailer we are a chef, and in most versions after that, we are a waiter: we’re delivering to a client what they want.

Brett Winn, Creative Director at The Refinery.

basic but important

show respect, be receptive

These two characteristics don’t come as a surprise when building a strong relationship, but it’s crucial to keep them in mind. When it comes to treating your clients with respect, it’s important that they feel comfortable offering their opinions and feedback without being judged or subjected to harsh criticism.

Listen and follow along to their ideas with your complete attention and be open to editing your trailer in a manner that you might not like. While this doesn’t mean that you aren’t allowed to ask questions and share your own opinions on the final cut, it’s important to distinguish between a project for yourself and one for your client. In the end, the client gets the final say on what is included in the trailer and how it looks.

pushing the limits

problem-solving and stamina

Take charge when it comes to tackling challenges that arise during the cutting process and in complicated situations. As an editor, it’s your job to invent and develop new structures and techniques that can be used by others in the industry. No two trailers are the same, so you’ll need to designate much of your time pushing the boundaries of trailer editing and exceeding expectations.

Also, try not to get worn down. While fatigue is inevitable at some point, it’s crucial to develop a personal plan that will help you stay more motivated and push the limits of your creativity.

Sara Gerbereux

Sara Gerbereux

November 2, 2022

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